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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
pharaoh. mohammed morsi makes a bold power grab. and a new constitution is pushed throughout without the input of christians or moderates. >> tom: and a look at the film that is exposing the dark world of sex trafficking, and bringing victims a message of hope. >> george: as nigeria's christians suffer more attacks, the international community seeks more tools to fight islamic terrorist. hello, everyone, i'm george thomas. >> wendy: and i'm we wendy griffith. twin car bombings on a military base in nigeria killed at least 15 people. it happened in the muslim north. officials say a bus packed with explosives rammed into st. andrew military protestant church right after sunday's services. about 10 minutes later, a car just outside the church exploded, as people fled from the first attack. boko haram is expected in the attack. boko haram is blamed for killing more than 760 nigerians this year alone. >> george: staggering numbers. he is executive director of a group that defends religious rights. ann, the international criminal court has released a court that boko haram has, in fact, com
what they view as a power grab by morsi. bill: also back here at home, this is history. another fight over the right to work laws in a historically union-dominated state. begin. tomato, obviously. haha. there's more than that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, but crisp. it's kind of like drinking a food that's a drink, or a drink that's a food, woooooh! [ male announcer ] taste it and describe the indescribable. could've had a v8. martha: as if you don't pay enough for your cable already, there's a new report, listen to this, that shows that your set-top box and your dvr are gobbling up, like little energy magnets in your tv room even when the power is off which costs you a lot of extra money. the consumer electronics association is trying to figures this problem. they're rolling out a plan that would save consumers they say 1 1/2 billion dollars over the next five years. this comes as federal regulators are trying to get into this game to consider imposing national energy standards on the set-top boxes. we'll see if that --. bill: i believe it. you touch that bo
, the president under siege there as angry crowds call for him to leave. could president morsi face the same fate as president hosni mubarak? we'll have the analysis straight ahead. heather: right now in cairo another day of mass demonstrations and unrest. tens of thousands of egyptians marching on the presidential palace, a compound that looks more like an armed camp these days. take a look at those pictures. these folks furious with president mohammed morsi with assuming dictatorial powers and ramming through a constitution that many fear will turn egypt into an islamic state. david shanker is the director of the program on arab politics at the washington institute for mere east policy and the former middle east adviser to secretary of defense donald rumsfeld. thank you so much for joining us. >> my pleasure. heather: you were there just prior to morsi's power grab. what was the mood then and did you see this coming? >> i think the brotherhood was very confident and morsi took the opportunity of course after the hamas negotiations of doing this. and i think he thought that he had it in the bag.
the military's barricade. president morsi attempts at talks failed this morning when few lawmakers attended and some of those actually walked out shortly after they begin. conor is live. >> political crisis in egypt continues to grow and last night it got violent as they breached the walls of the presidential palace. today was calm but preparing for more violence. egyptian military put up barriers around the presidential palace from concrete walls to putting up more barbed wire. the egyptian military appears to be taking up the role of mediator in the conflict. in a statement it warned of disastrous consequences if the crisis is not resolved. it is urging dialogue to avoid, quote, a dark tunnel. mohammed morsi has called for a day of dialogue but opposition groups rejected talks today. they walked out of meetings. the ones that bothered to show up. many didn't appear for the discussions. the egyptian opposition is demanding that a draft resolution on the constitution that is supposed to be voted on december 15th, they are demanding that vote be postponed indefinitely. they say the drafted c
of egyptian president mohammed morsi. those against morsi holding a raldy at the same time and the same place and those much smaller and calmer than what we've seen in egypt, well, obviously and thankfully. in that country today. the top court suspended the work indefinitely in what the judges are calling a protest against psychological and physical pressures and that's the latest development in response to the power grab in put himself above the constitutional committee, above the lauf. and steve, where do things stand now with that constitutional court. >> reporter: harris, you have the unusual situation here in cairo of the highest court in the country, the supreme constitutional court. and right now, its judges are basically afraid to go in to work. they say they're psychologically and physically intimidated by the crowd that was around that courthouse this morning and they did not go to the courthouse or carry out their work. and the suspension one week after the president of this country said any act he issues is final, not subject to the courts. so, within a week, we really have a cou
there a day after angry protestors force the president, president morsi to leave the presidential palace. now he's back, and the stage is set for a new confrontation. we are going to talk about what this all means for us here at home. plus, the tv show that got this guy so fired up cops say he shot his girlfriend. well now he's charged with attempted murder. we'll tell you more about that story next. [ male announcer ] are you considering a new medicare plan? then you may be looking for help in choosing the right plan for your needs. so don't wait. call now. whatever your health coverage needs, unitedhealthcare can help you find the right plan. are you looking for something nice and easy? a medicare advantage plan can give you doctor, hospital and prescription drug coverage all in one plan... for nothing more than what you already pay for part b. you'll also have the flexibility to change doctors from a network of providers dedicated to helping you stay healthy. call now to learn more. unitedhealthcare has the information you need so you'll be better prepared when making medicare decisions. m
several phone calls to egyptian president morsi and he refused to take the calls because he wants hamas to be stronger. and we are so close to falling over a real cliff into total chaos because of u.s. weakness that i think is trivial, the u.n. vote or where israelis build 2,000 house ons the outskirts of jerusalem, no one will remember that a few months from now. >> when they did that, that was against the u.s. wishes. they defied the u.s. wishes to so nobody seems to be listening to them. and there's egypt. and the continuing protests in egypt. thousands of the people who were demonstrating a year or so ago against mubarak, now demonstrate being against the new egyptian president morsi and the new draft constitution written by an islamist assembly. and people say it doesn't provide enough guarantees for women's rights or minority religion you make of the situation in egypt and the dangers it could turn into an islamist state? >> the bottom line in egypt is it's bad for the egyptian in their political future. probably not as bad for the long-term interests of the united states. anytime
authority placed several phone calls to egyptian president morsi and he refused to take the call, he wants hamas to be stronger, and the problems in the middle east are so large now and part of this because of our weakness, and, where they build the houses on the outskirts of jerusalem, no one will remember that two months from now. >> chris: they died it against u.s. wishes an defied the administration, too, no one seems to be listening to them. again, there is egypt. and the continuing protest, senator bayh in egypt, thousands of people demonstrating a year or so ago against hosni mubarak and now the new egyptian president morsi and the draft constitution written by an islamist assembly and critics, including those on the street say it doesn't provide enough guarantees for women's rights or minority religions. what do you make of the situation, in egypt and the dangers that it could turn into an islamic state. >> the bottom line in egypt, it is bad for egyptians and their political future, and perhaps not quite as bad for the long term national security interests of the united states, an
a referendum. this comes a day after they said it would boycott a referendum. >> president mohamed morsi granted himself sweeping powers. that prompted some judges to call for an indefinite strike. >> germany is reported to be considering the export of tanks and armored vehicles to saudi arabia, a country which is already -- has already used its weapons to put down a popular uprising in the country neighboring. >> they say that hundreds of boxer armoured patrol vehicles -- should the deal goes through, it would make the government an accomplice to islamist extremists, some said. >> saudi arabia is reportedly looking to purchase several hundred of these boxer armoured patrol vehicles. "der spiegel" magazine says this was discussed last week at a meeting. a government spokesman declined to comment. >> confidentiality protect interest of potential buyers, as well as our relations with such countries. many requests are turned down. even if they are proved, they often do not ultimately lead to a deal. >> the blonde is where -- the bundeswehr currently uses the boxer as a transporter. it could
of dictatorship. and judge napolitano is here. the best way to describe what morsi did, he came in and tried to make himself a dictator. >>judge napolitano: he did. he came in, initially, as the man of the people, as the first popularly elected chief executive of egypt in its 3,000 year history. in a year of being in office, he said, the courts can not everrule me and no one can sue me and no one can second-guess me and what i say is the law. while he did that, he got the legislature, which was elected with him to write a new constitution without debate or input and against the rules of the present constitution and he is just putting it out there for the public to vote on. why are the judges so upset? the egyptian system of judges is similar to ours and to the british system, and judges can say to the government, that is unconstitutional. can you not do it. not in the islamic world which is what the constitution will have. their goal is an oath that is any dealt to shiria law, not rights of divided powers. >>shepard: egypt is the most powerful because of the numbers, 80 million people in egy
. >> turning to egypt, egyptian president morsi resended most of a decree that gave him sweeping powers but he's moving ahead with a referendum next weekend on a new constitution. does israel care whether egypt becomes an islamic state? >> egypt's stability and democracy is important to us. israel has a interest in stable, peaceful and democratic egypt. we won't get into the internal politics just as we don't except them to get involved in our politics. egypt needs stability and peace. it's not just an israeli interest, it's egyptian, regional, a global interest. the egyptian israeli peace and we hope egypt overcomes the difficulties as appeal fully -- peacefully as possible. >> does the government, given his role in brokering the cease-fire in gaza, dow trust morsi to keep the peace? >> he says repeatedly to americans and others he has every intention of upholding the peace and he played a constructive role in helping achieve a cease-fire surrounding the recent fighting in gaza and we hope egypt continues to play that kind of role. >> immediately after the palestinians a week or so ago were v
the world this morning, a turnaround by egypt's president mohammad morsi. the leader announced he would annul a controversial decree that granted him sweeping powers. however, he's not backing down on a referendum on a draft scheduled for next weekend. >> egypt's vice president, flanked by notable figures, announced that president morsi rescinded a controversial degree. today president morsi met with members of opposition in an attempt to defuse the fallout from the decree that granted him sweeping powers. the president insisted a referendum on the draft will go ahead as planned next saturday. tonight the president said if the constitution is not approved next week, he will order the public to directly elect a new constituent assembly to write another constitution for the country. egyptian sources tell nbc news a man with links to -- the alleged leader of a militant cell involved in the attack that killed four americans on september 11 in benghazi. nbc news, cairo. >> venezuelan president hugo chavez is back in cuba for more treatment of cancer that has recurred. he announced he will ha
opponents of president morsi there clashing with his supporters. the street battles according to reports leaving at least seven people dead, hundreds injured. now the government is panning protests near the presidential palace with troops and tanks and forcing the decree there. david lee miller is watching all this live in jerusalem with more. david lee? >> reporter: jenna we are awaiting what might be an address by the egyptian president mohammed morsi. it is expected to take place at any time. we're told that during the day he met with the army chief as well as his ministers to try to come up with some way to stablize the country. he was in the presidential palace earlier in the day. this despite the fact that there was some very violent clashes in the last 24 hours just outside that palace. take a look at the tape and you can see what took place just a few hours ago. on one side supporters of th president morsi. on the other secular groups say they oppose the islamist agenda. during the clashes firebombs and rocks were thrown. there was also gunfire. as you mentioned at least seven de
as the current situation. >> chris: all right, let's turn to egypt, where egyptian president morsi this weekend rescinded, it appears, most of the decree that gave him sweeping powers but is moving ahead with a refer recommend, next weekend, on a new constitution. does israel care whether egypt becomes an islamic state? >> well, egypt's civility and democracy, israel has an interest in stable, peaceful and democratic egypt and we will not get involved in the internal politics of egypt like we don't expect egyptians to get into our internal politics. egypt needs peace and it's not just an israeli interest, it is an egyptian and regional interest and, is a global interest, to egyptian-israeli peace and we hope egypt overcomes its internal difficulties as quickly and peacefully as possible. >> chris: does your government, given, particularly his role in helping to broker the cease-fire with gaza, with hamas, in gaza, do you trust morsi to keep the peace with israel. >> he has said repeatedly to americans and others who visit egypt he has every intention of upholding the peace and played a construc
's stateside. and what did it did for near east policy, the latest from egypt after president mohammad morsi granted himself hoarse above the court. washington journal, live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public-service by your television provider. >> now secretary of state hillary clinton talks about her recent travels to the middle east to help broker a ceasefire agreement between israel and hamas and the gaza strip. she also, the iranian nuclear threat and criticizes israel's decision to build homes on israeli occupied lands. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> i am somewhat overwhelmed, but i'm obviously thinking i should sit down. [laughter] i prepared some remarks for tonight, but then i thought maybe we could just watch that video a few more times. [laughter] and then the next time, i could count the hairstyles, which is one of my favorite pastimes. [laughter] i think i now know what it feels like to be one of haim's mighty morphin power rangers. [laughter] well, i guess we should expect nothing le
with chants of "cancel, cancel, we won't leave until he leaves" a reference to president morsi. the deck seems to be stacked against them and the moment seems to have shifted in favor of the president, michael but they still have their voice and they're coming out protesting again, it looks like. >> of course this all relates back, give people the context, to the power grab, others call expansion of powers by mr. morsi which some in the judiciary oppose. others have approved of. all relates to new constitution. give us the synopsis there. >> reporter: the president's position, all along, has been he was elected to establish the democratic institutions after the 2011 revolution. he said he inherited the legislature and announced decrees to push through with the process of forming a constitution of establishing a parliament. and avoiding what he called the impediment of the old judges and the remnants from the mubarak regime who wanted to block his way. then you have opposition factions who described that process as a power grab, as the president's attempt, as the muslim brotherhood's attempt to
morsi of egypt was very active and positive in forcing a cease-fire on the hamas and the jihad. so i think that we have to accept the realities that our neighbors do not prescribe to the same principles and values that we share. but we have to live with them and find ways to talk with them and we have to find ways to create rapport between the leaderships of our countries in order to maybe establish a different patron of relations but one that is based on mutual respect and mutual security for both sides. >> rose: it may be better in the end? >> i hope so. listen, we never can lose optimism to be and hope for the improvement in the situation and this is what has to guide us. i don't suggest that pessimistic people will be in positions of leadership in any country. you have to be optimistic, you have to try ever possible avenue to improve things and i think that this is what we have to do and i believe that our government, which ever government we will have whether netanyahu or another one we will continue on this direction of optimism to achieve peace and better relations with our ne
about several things. first of all, all concerning president mohammed morsi and this growing perception that he is making himself too powerful. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. >> opposition factions back protesting against mohammed morrissey for nearly two weeks. most of the protests have been limited to tahrir square, but they're now going to the source of their anger, president morrissey, and his presidential palace. >> why come here? >> because it's -- we got fed up. >> he doesn't respect us. he don't want to listen to our demands. >> reporter: what's your message to him by coming out here? >> that what he is doing is completely unfair. this is not what we asked for. it's complete dictatorship. >> reporter: at one point there were tense moments when protests clashed with police and broke through a police barrier, but things called down pretty quickly. the president in no danger. he left at some point. the protests continue empassioned but peaceful. there you hear the chants of dictator, dictator. like much of egypt, most of these people are muslims, but you'll also find the moderates,
summoned israeli ambassadors to condemn the action. in egypt new protests today against president morsi and massive protests are called for tomorrow. syria bomb rebels today. secretary clinton says that country is considering using chemical weapons. >> this is a red line for the united states. i'm not going to telegraph in any specifics what we would do in the event of credible evidence. >> joining me now is former state department egypt officer joel reuben. good to have you here. let's start with that red line where syria is right now. it's estimated more than 40,000 people have been killed in this 20-month-old revolve against the government. these new reports suggesting the fresh activity at syrian chemical weapons depots. earlier this year the president singled out that threat posed by chemical weapons as a cause for greater u.s. involvement. now secretary clinton giving this warning. where do you see this headed? >> this is a very overt declaration by the secretary. it's been estimated it would take about 75,000 troops to secure these chemical weapon sites if they are used. syria ha
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)

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